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      Drink before you are thirsty

      Drink before you are thirsty

      Are you drinking enough water? If you answered no, you are not alone as more than half of North Americans are not getting the amount of water they need in a day. If you suffer from headaches, constipation, tiredness, muscle cramps, dull, dry skin, or if your urine is a dark yellow colour, this is a sign that you are not drinking enough. 

      Water is pretty boring. It is colourless and tasteless with no caloric value, but it is the most important element of your diet because it is involved in every function in the body. 

      The average recommendation for water per day is 2 litres for women and 3 litres for men. This number will change depending on the climate and if you are exercising. Right now I am on an island in Sicily for the summer (I know, poor me right?!) and the temperature here is above 30 degrees celsius every day so I am trying to focus on drinking more to replace what I have lost in sweat. I do this by having one litre of lemon water as soon as I wake up and bring a water bottle with me wherever I go. We have also put up a heavy bag here and when we workout, I make sure that I am drinking an additional litre of fluid after we finish exercising.

      When training you need to be in an optimal state of hydration for both your endurance and performance. During exercise, you lose electrolytes which are made up of sodium and potassium. Sodium maintains the fluid in our body, keeping it hydrated while helping muscles to relax. Potassium has a similar function and also aids in the storage of carbohydrates to fuel the muscles. If you sweat a lot during a workout, or train for long periods of time, it is a good idea to add electrolytes to your drink (plus they make your water taste so good!). Sport drinks are what people gravitate to because they contain carbohydrates and electrolytes needed for hydration and energy, but I find that they have a lot of unnecessary ingredients and colouring. Instead, I like electrolyte tablets (I am using them in Italy right now). You can get them at any health food store and most grocery stores and you can throw them in your gym bag to use whenever you need them. Nuun hydration is a great brand and has a variety of flavours as well as specific tablets for sports, immune support, and some with added caffeine. My favourite is Strawberry Lemonade.

      Another great drink is coconut water. It is a natural source of electrolytes and what many Muay Thai fighters drink in Thailand because of the extremely hot temperatures. You can also make your own sport drink by using a few simple ingredients.

       

      Toss some electrolyte tablets in your gym bag and use whenever.

       

       

       
      Coconut water is popular among muay thai fighters to restore electrolytes.

      Maple-Lemon Electrolyte Water Recipe

       

      Ingredients:

      Instructions:

      Combine all ingredients in a glass and stir until the salt is dissolved.

      If you want to up your hydration and improve your performance try the following recommendations:

      • ensure you are well hydrated before you exercise - this means drinking water throughout the day
      • replace 80% of the sweat lost during exercise 
      • drink fluids that have electrolytes if exercise is high intensity, more than 1.5 hours, or in hot a hot climate
      • drink at least ½  a litre immediately after exercise
      • add fruit juice, electrolytes, or BCAA’s to make your water taste good and to add carbohydrates, sodium and potassium
      • continue to drink fluid after exercise until at least 1 litre is consumed

      The most important thing to remember is to drink before you feel thirsty and ensure that most of what you drink in a day is water.

       

        

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

      Michelle Stone

      I am a lot of things. I am a woman, a school teacher, a registered nutritionist, a fitness enthusiast, a partner, a daughter, a writer, a friend, a chef... But most of all I am a fighter. Yes, I train at Legacy Fight Club, but what I mean by “a fighter” is not just in the literal sense of the word which is “to contend in battle or physical combat”, or, “to engage in boxing”. It is to constantly put forth effort and determination in everything I do. So when I say I have been a fighter all my life, it is true.  You can reach me at Michellestone2424@gmail.com for any questions or advice ot Nutrition and Lifestyle.

       

       

      Excercise, muay thai, and physical activities for your mental health

      Excercise, muay thai, and physical activities for your mental health

      Most of the time we are so focused on fitness goals that we forget about how important exercise is for our mental and emotional wellness. With the stressful pace of everyday life and now a world pandemic, it is so important that we find strategies to support our mental health. Mental health includes our emotional, psychological, and social well-being. It affects how we think, feel, and act and determines how we handle stress, relate to others, and make choices. Physical activity is a very important way to maintain this balance. Getting sweaty at least five times a week has been proven to boost mood, improve brain function, improve sleep, reduce cortisol, and help manage anxiety and stress.

      For a long time, the main purpose of my going to the gym was to be physically fit. Now, I realize that activities which challenge me such as training for a half marathon and participating in Tough Mudders, inspires self-discipline and helps me build a strong mindset which I carry into my everyday life. This is why I love training in Muay Thai as Martial arts is known to promote physical and mental control. Each week, when I show up at Legacy, I love that my body is getting stronger and my kicks more powerful, but I also find that when I am in need of a break, or want to give up on something that seems impossible to master, I have the mental focus to help me dig deeper to find that extra push.

      Remember, going to the gym is not always about having a six pack. The social benefits of working out with other people is a great recipe for maintaining mental wellness. Being part of a team or club provides you with a sense of community that is working towards a common goal. This mix of exercise and social activity will surely boost your mood when you are feeling down.

      If you are not one to join a big box gym or don’t have enough time to workout, remember that any kind of physical activity is healthy for your body and mind. Find something you like to do or have wanted to try and schedule it into your calendar to find time for your own well-being. 

       

       

      Michelle Stone

      I am a lot of things. I am a woman, a school teacher, a registered nutritionist, a fitness enthusiast, a partner, a daughter, a writer, a friend, a chef... But most of all I am a fighter. Yes, I train at Legacy Fight Club, but what I mean by “a fighter” is not just in the literal sense of the word which is “to contend in battle or physical combat”, or, “to engage in boxing”. It is to constantly put forth effort and determination in everything I do. So when I say I have been a fighter all my life, it is true

       

       

       

      Training, body image, and your self-esteem

      Training, body image, and your self-esteem

      When you look in the mirror are you happy with your body? Unfortunately, only about 21% of adults feel satisfied with the way they look. This image of the body begins in the early stages of childhood and is often affected by family, friends, social pressure and the media. 

      Body image and self-esteem directly influence each other and this is why I love training in Muay Thai. Martial arts is a positive tool for improving body image as it is a discipline that teaches you to respect and value your body for more than what it looks like. After a warm up of jumping jacks, pushups, sit ups and burpees I am tired, but I am also fired up and ready to push my limits to see how hard I can strike the bag, test the strength of my swing kicks, and see what my body is able to do. It is this feeling that builds my body image and not whether I measure up to the fitness models in Women’s Health Magazine. 

      Professional fighters are some of the most fit athletes in the world as a result of the long hours put in training and conditioning, but even if you are fighting recreationally, it is still one of the most effective fat-burning workouts. Each session of authentic Muay Thai training works the whole body and easily burns around 600-700 calories in an hour (depending on your metabolic rate) making this a great choice of exercise to lose weight and tone your body.

      There is a saying that “abs are built in the kitchen”. Along with a regular fitness routine, what you eat plays the most important part in how your body looks and feels. Incorporating a well-balanced diet into your lifestyle with lean protein, good carbs, fats and loads of vegetables will improve your performance, provide you with energy, and help build muscle.

      Your body is an important vessel. Be sure to nourish it with good food and appreciate it for what it does and not always what it looks like. 

       

       

       

      Meet our holistic nutritionist

      Meet our holistic nutritionist

      teamLEGACY.BLOG would like to introduce our Holistic Nutritionist, Michelle Stone.  Michelle will be making sure we stay informed and educated with our food choices as our newest nutrition & liftstyle writer! 

      But first, here's a little bit about her:


      I am a lot of things. I am a woman, a school teacher, a registered nutritionist, a fitness enthusiast, a partner, a daughter, a writer, a friend, a chef... But most of all I am a fighter. Yes, I train at Legacy Fight Club, but what I mean by “a fighter” is not just in the literal sense of the word which is “
      to contend in battle or physical combat”, or, “to engage in boxing”. It is to constantly put forth effort and determination in everything I do. So when I say I have been a fighter all my life, it is true. 

      For me, fighting is putting in 100% until I get the results I want. It is definitely not easy, and the little voice in my head tries to talk me out of a ton of things, but I have this fire inside to help push me through to achieve what I set out to do. Everyone has it. Whether it is a voice, a feeling, the fear of failing, or exhilaration once you have accomplished a goal. You just need to focus on what drives you. 

      This is what has brought me to love Muay Thai. I was introduced to boxing when Federico asked me to do a class with him in Toronto over two years ago. I had been dating him for less than a month and was terrified to make a fool of myself as I had never put on a pair of boxing gloves before. However, I played many sports and went to the gym often so I figured I might be ok. We walked into a rundown-looking place with a ring in the middle of a tiny gym looking like something right out of Fight Club. Federico wrapped my hands, I slid on the gloves for the first time, and man was I hooked! Every movement, burpee, and jab-cross made me feel alive. It was hard, technical, and exhausting, and I knew this was something I needed in my life. Since then, I have joined Legacy and every day I put on my gloves and strive to become a better fighter in and outside of the ring.